A Bit Obsessed {Metallic Everything}

Hey all,

So I have a problem. A problem with wanting everything to be metallic. Silver, brass, gold! I want it all! But with my discovery of the greatest invention (Sharpie Oil Based Paint Markers), I couldn’t stop myself. I originally purchased the metallic gold marker to finish off my tile coaster projects. I figured that it would be a waste not to use it as much as possible and I had several, still attached clam pairs that could use a bit of a makeover. So why not color them gold?

Though the natural coloring is pretty, I think laying these guys around the house or in jars will be more grabby with the gold.

Though the natural coloring is pretty, I think laying these guys around the house or in jars will be more grabby with the gold.

 

They’re pretty easy to complete. Get yourself some shells and at least one of the markers. I ended up running out and getting the fine point one as well, for all those nooks and crannies that the larger tip just won’t cover up the original shell color. Because it’s a paint marker, they cover pretty well with just one coat, but I would recommend that you let them dry and then double check that everything got covered. Once you do, sit back and enjoy your beautiful metallic shells.

Just sitting pretty. They're so shiny, I just love the finish that the markers gave the shells.

Just sitting pretty. They’re so shiny, I just love the finish that the markers gave the shells.

 

 

Finished product: gorgeous clam shells dripping (or well, colored) in gold.

Finished product: gorgeous clam shells dripping (or well, colored) in gold.

 

So, this project may be tedious in making sure that all the little bits get covered, but I’m definitely happy I did them!

 

XOXO,

Ashley

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Old Jars Make Desk Storage {Rust Goes Beachy Chic}

Just a quick little post!

I recently picked up these two adorable jars at a vintage sale.

These jars are the cutest. They have great, thick glass.

These jars are the cutest. They have great, thick glass.

They used to be jelly jars and they have a nice, rust to their tops.

I originally thought that I would cover up these rusted tops. I would pick the toppers and then spray the whole shabang. But then I realized...

I originally thought that I would cover up these rusted tops. I would pick the toppers and then spray the whole shabang. But then I realized…

 

Wouldn’t it be cool to embrace the rusty, vintage nature of the jars, rather than cover them up? And so I did. I also decided to go that way with the shells I glued on top. I must have tried four different pairings. Started with beautifully perfect shells, but it just seemed wrong. Then I moved to smaller, tulip conch shells, but they were too colorful and intact. This went on for awhile. So then I realized, I really needed to embrace the old, rustic charm. I plopped a piece of coral that was coming apart and another conch. This time the conch was covered in barnacles and age holes, pretty roughed up. They fit PERFECTLY. I couldn’t be happier with how these two little jars turned out. A little hot glue and drying time, and now I have two super cute jars.

What a great pair. I love the texture, age, and beauty of them both. They're going to look awesome on my desk.

What a great pair. I love the texture, age, and beauty of them both. They’re going to look awesome on my desk.

And what, you may ask, would even fit in these tiny jars that you fretted over? Well, I think they’re perfect for my tonnage of paperclips and binder clips.

 

See? They already look great on my desktop, holding exactly what I need.

See? They already look great on my desktop, holding exactly what I need.

 

So what do you think? This project was under $6 with the jars and the shells. I’m a sucker for office organization, containers, and shells, so this was right in my wheel house.

 

XOXO,

Ashley

Never Take Martha’s Name in Vain {Sea Shell Wreath}

I’m baaaaack!

This post is aptly named for one specific reason. I had wanted to make a beautiful seashell wreath for our front door, to enjoy during the summertime. I found a great, and seemingly simple, tutorial with a video on Martha Stewart’s website. It seemed straight forward enough. Seemed is the keyword in that sentence. Here is my interpretation of the steps required:

Step One: start with a metal filled, straw wreath base. This was my first mistake. I can see why it would help, in Martha’s tutorial, but for me it just made a huge mess. My straw wreath base left bits and pieces in its wake. I rarely have to vacuum post-crafting and I had to do it twice. This could have been the wreath that I purchased, as it seemed to molt as soon as it left its packaging. It did provide a great amount of support and flatter surface for the shells, though. So there’s that, right?

Step Two: using crafting tacky glue, begin placing your shells on the wreath form. Here’s where I lost it. I began this project the week before, creating a first layer of shells. It was a sticky mess and I lost interest pretty quick, considering that though tacky glue holds a bit more permanently than other types of glue, it also takes longer to dry. They aren’t immediately bonded to the wreath, so keeping them in one place and not sliding around or falling off was nearly impossible. I left the wreath half-completed, like the picture below, for a good week or so. I just didn’t have the willpower to glue and hold, while still trying to add more shells.

This is how the wreath stayed during that week, until I finally gave up with the tutorial directions and went out on my own!

This is how the wreath stayed during that week, until I finally gave up with the tutorial directions and went out on my own!

Step Three: Try again a week later with failed results. Continue to try to add layers of shells on top of the original shells. Fill in the creases where you can. When I started out, I thought that maybe my patience level had returned and I could take on the sticky mess once again. But as I continued, I realized this wasn’t so. Which leads me to my next step in this tutorial.

Step Four: Take the good lady Martha’s name in vain. I should have never said it and I paid the price. I wrote a caption for the above picture, before continuing with the project. It doomed me. I said, “Dear Martha Stewart, I tried your way, and it’s a sticky mess. Now this sucker will be done my way.” And with several sticks of hot glue and my trusty hot glue gun, I did finally complete this project. It took several hours and there was something harmed in the process.

My poor thumb. This sucker stuck with me all week, what a frustrating place to burn yourself on your low-heat, hot glue gun.

My poor thumb. 

 

This sucker stuck with me all week, what a frustrating place to burn yourself on your low-heat, hot glue gun. Right at the end of the project, I dripped a healthy gob of hot glue directly onto my finger. It hurt so badly, I realized immediately that it was dear Martha punishing me for speaking poorly of her tutorial. But there’s always a silver lining, right? The wreath did get finished, it is a million pounds heavier, and is just waiting for summer to be hung on our front door. What’s also funny is, that about the time I was finishing this project, a friend of mine was sending me some awesome info on a place to pick up some beachy items. She knows me so well!

Perfect summer door accessory.

Perfect summer door accessory.

 

So, overall, this project only cost me about $5 with the wreath form and the glue sticks. The shells are slowly decreasing my large collection that was going to waste. Was it worth my thumb being burned? I think so.

 

XOXO,

Ashley